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OneThousandOne represents the amount of time, verbally, that it takes to count to one second. In this one second of time, a great thing happened at The Nebraska Medical Center. In fact, several great things probably happened. A patient was cured, a researcher found the missing link, a nurse treated an injury, a doctor comforted a family or maybe a child just smiled.
MOMENTS IN MEDICINE at THE NEBRASKA MEDICAL CENTER
Winter | 2014

Winter | 2014

  • Keeping Hope Alive
    No one wants to hear the word cancer. But if there is one cancer that you would least like to hear come from your doctor’s mouth, it would probably be brain cancer.
  • Leading the Revolution
    Imagine a day when doctors can identify the exact gene mutation that is causing a cancer to grow. With this information, they are able create a unique drug designed to target the abnormality. This drug is customized for each individual and has the capability to attack the molecular alterations that are fueling the cancer and ultimately halt its deadly course.
  • A Standing Ovation
    Cora Christensen describes her care at The Nebraska Medical Center like that of a well-rehearsed symphony — a welcome relief when much of her health over the past 30 years has been more like an opera with its share of tragic moments.
  • A Legacy of Influence
    To understand why Michael Sitorius, MD, is where he is today, you have to start at the beginning.
  • A Tribute to Glenn A. Fosdick
    After more than 35 years as a leader in health care administration and 12 years as president and CEO of The Nebraska Medical Center, Glenn A. Fosdick has retired. Fosdick’s legacy will be remembered as one that brought vision to The Nebraska Medical Center while inspiring a new level of quality and excellence in every aspect of the organization.
  • Decompressing Pain
    Susie Young doesn’t know what it feels like to be stabbed. But if she could describe the feeling, she thinks she would come very close. It’s a pain she endured for years — a sharp, piercing pain that started in the back of her neck and traveled to her eye — “like someone was stabbing me with a knife,” she says.