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Serious Medicine. Extraordinary Care.

Caregiving

  • Being a Caregiver
    "Formal" caregivers are paid for their services and have had training and education in providing care. "Informal" caregivers, also called family caregivers, are people who provide care to family or friends, usually without payment.
  • Caregivers Need to Care for Themselves
    More than 22 million Americans are involved in some form of helping elderly family members or friends with their daily routines. If you're part of this group, whether you call yourself a caregiver, or simply a good daughter or son, you know that caring for an aging parent or friend has its rewards and its trials.
  • Caring for an Ill Loved One
    Caring for anyone is difficult, even in the best of circumstances. Here are tips to help make the task easier.
  • Caring for the Caregiver
    Caregivers come in all shapes and sizes. They can be adult children, spouses, siblings, friends or neighbors, who help with daily activities such as bathing, feeding and clothing.
  • Helping a Friend With an Addiction
    When a friend shows signs of abusing alcohol or other drugs, it's hard to know what to do or say.
  • Helping Someone with a Mental Illness
    Caring for someone you love who is sick or disabled is never easy. When the illness affects your loved one’s state of mind, the demands placed on you can be especially difficult.
  • Helping Someone with Memory Loss
    In older people, it's easy to mistake memory problems for the everyday forgetfulness that some people experience as they grow older.
  • How to Plan for Long-Term Care
    Most older people are independent. But later in life, you or someone you love may need help with everyday activities, such as shopping, cooking and bathing.